Image 0b645fdf84
  • Publish Date: Posted about 1 year ago
  • Author:by Jayne Halperin

10 tips to manage a remote team

​Here's my top tips on managing a team during the current crisis.I’ll start off by saying, it probably boils down to one golden rule, but as the internet loves a list let’s park that and I’ll let you work out what that is… it’s not difficult if you read on.Part of why I love working at Cedar is the fact that everyone gets on fantastically well, as cliched as it sounds, we are like a family.  There is lots of banter, (like most offices) but we know when to draw the line.  We have meetings, but not for meetings' sake, we have a very open culture; everyone helps everyone.  We are an honest and open organisation, if someone makes a mistake, they will openly disclose it.  If someone has a personal problem, they often share it.  One reason why we have a lot of repeat business is down to how we communicate, we share information internally and help each other understand our clients needs.  We have a flexible working policy where if needed, you can work from home.On a day-to-day basis, however, people are based in the office.  So, when it was advised to work from home the panic set in. How would we be able to uphold our high-performing, fun, collaborative, supportive culture?  The last thing I wanted was for people to feel isolated, both literally and metaphorically, especially during this challenging time. In the six weeks I have learnt the following: Speak to people on video as much as possible and include personal (non-work related) conversation. This is important in order to continue build rapport and gain trust and has the benefit of connecting us to the world outside our bubbles Set clear expectations. People work better with a clear goal in mind and reaffirm your message if needed, to ensure it is understood Keep having one on ones, keep people motivated and make sure you follow up. Try and do this daily as 24 hours can be a long time not speaking and it helps keep people and projects on track Ensure teams keep communicating with clients/candidates.  It connects us to the outside world and helps adjust the operational focus accordingly. Customers also know that that we are still thinking of them and that as we exit the current situation, we will be in a place to support them Have scheduled group meetings and set an agenda to create the continuity of the working day. Routine is important even in normal times, but especially during periods of uncertainty. Having structure and a reason to brush your hair helps motivate.Don’t ‘over manage’, it is very easy to worry that if you can’t see what people are doing, they may not be keeping to task. Trust your people, there’s a reason you hired them in the first placeTry to avoid cancelling a one 2 one. You don’t want employees to feel undervaluedContinue leading by example-share with the team what you are doing to demonstrate accountability.Use your CRM and monitor activity not success. This is not a market where it’s reasonable to ask teams to ‘get out there and sell’. We want them to be there to support customers and it helps motivation for employees to know someone is paying attention.Make yourself available, both as a manager and as an empathetic person. Friendships and bonds can be built and strengthened in time of adversity. Treats this as an opportunity to get to know your employees betterIn summary, you shouldn’t underestimate the influence of a manager on creating a collaborative and healthy culture, be it remotely or face to face and as many things in life communication is key.  Managers must keep teams engaged, connected and feeling valued, even more so in these unprecedent times. Continue to remain positive, professional, fair and empathetic and above all stay safe and as short cockney in a BT advert once said, “its good to talk”.

Share this Article
Back to Blogs

​Here's my top tips on managing a team during the current crisis.

I’ll start off by saying, it probably boils down to one golden rule, but as the internet loves a list let’s park that and I’ll let you work out what that is… it’s not difficult if you read on.

Part of why I love working at Cedar is the fact that everyone gets on fantastically well, as cliched as it sounds, we are like a family.  There is lots of banter, (like most offices) but we know when to draw the line.  We have meetings, but not for meetings' sake, we have a very open culture; everyone helps everyone.  We are an honest and open organisation, if someone makes a mistake, they will openly disclose it.  If someone has a personal problem, they often share it.  One reason why we have a lot of repeat business is down to how we communicate, we share information internally and help each other understand our clients needs.  We have a flexible working policy where if needed, you can work from home.

On a day-to-day basis, however, people are based in the office.  So, when it was advised to work from home the panic set in. How would we be able to uphold our high-performing, fun, collaborative, supportive culture?  The last thing I wanted was for people to feel isolated, both literally and metaphorically, especially during this challenging time. In the six weeks I have learnt the following: Speak to people on video as much as possible and include personal (non-work related) conversation. This is important in order to continue build rapport and gain trust and has the benefit of connecting us to the world outside our bubbles Set clear expectations. People work better with a clear goal in mind and reaffirm your message if needed, to ensure it is understood Keep having one on ones, keep people motivated and make sure you follow up. Try and do this daily as 24 hours can be a long time not speaking and it helps keep people and projects on track Ensure teams keep communicating with clients/candidates.  It connects us to the outside world and helps adjust the operational focus accordingly. Customers also know that that we are still thinking of them and that as we exit the current situation, we will be in a place to support them Have scheduled group meetings and set an agenda to create the continuity of the working day. Routine is important even in normal times, but especially during periods of uncertainty. Having structure and a reason to brush your hair helps motivate.

Don’t ‘over manage’, it is very easy to worry that if you can’t see what people are doing, they may not be keeping to task. Trust your people, there’s a reason you hired them in the first placeTry to avoid cancelling a one 2 one. You don’t want employees to feel undervaluedContinue leading by example-share with the team what you are doing to demonstrate accountability.

Use your CRM and monitor activity not success. This is not a market where it’s reasonable to ask teams to ‘get out there and sell’. We want them to be there to support customers and it helps motivation for employees to know someone is paying attention.

Make yourself available, both as a manager and as an empathetic person. Friendships and bonds can be built and strengthened in time of adversity. Treats this as an opportunity to get to know your employees betterIn summary, you shouldn’t underestimate the influence of a manager on creating a collaborative and healthy culture, be it remotely or face to face and as many things in life communication is key.  Managers must keep teams engaged, connected and feeling valued, even more so in these unprecedent times. Continue to remain positive, professional, fair and empathetic and above all stay safe and as short cockney in a BT advert once said, “its good to talk”.

Latest Blogs

View All Blogs
Screen Shot 2018 07 12 At 3
What it takes to be a successful PE portfolio company CEO

​Whilst there is not a one size fits all solution for what we see in successful PE portfolio company CEO’s we are able to see some clear trends when it comes this. Below we have attempted to answer...

Image 790ea9f990
How to Make Your CV Stand Out

Looking for your next finance role? The first step is getting your CV right. With such a small window in which to impress recruiters, it’s vital that you’re able to make your CV stand out from the ...

Cover Wave 1200x628
A new wave of Executive Search

​Cedar Recruitment is, as we’re sure you know, a well-established, highly successful recruitment business. Our reputation was initially built on our expertise in accountancy and financial services...

Image 70a5eb1f6f
Public Practice Priorities for the year(s) ahead

Just over a year ago, we were starting to learn about a strange illness that was causing people to die in a number of countries - China, Italy and then, in small numbers at first, the UK. If you Go...

Picture1
How Covid-19 has changed company cultures.

​We are coming up to 12 months of working from home and company culture is one of the biggest things that has changed in our working environment.From a recruitment perspective, one of the most comm...

Image C3446935a3
Temperature Check – Recruitment in 2021

As we close on 2020, supposedly the year of clarity (20/20 vision) what do our Consultants see the future holding.Despite the threat of a 2nd mutated strain arriving at our shores and the likelihoo...

Scrooge
"I don’t make merry myself at Christmas" [sic]

​Scrooge was a much-misunderstood man. That thought may be behind the statement by Julien Lenglet, Head of the Antony Hospital in Paris, who believes that festive celebrations could lead to a surge...

Image 67889e23f0
All Change: pandemic winners and losers

This has been a truly extraordinary year for businesses. For the recruitment industry as much as any other, Covid-19 has been more devastating than anything in living memory. Over 500 million jobs ...

Recovery
4 successful strategies for securing talent during the global recovery

Over the last five months, organisations across the globe have made extraordinary changes in their working practices in response to COVID 19 and Talent Acquisition has been no exception. Whilst man...

Image 39dd5aed8f
Baby birds, jobs data and the future of recruitment…

Like baby birds in a nest, the different sectors of the economy are straining to be fed, their mouths open and begging the Chancellor to attend to their needs first. However, nature, as we know, is...

Image Cb9c7c2608
Procurement – at the heart of the crisis and the centre of the recovery

Public sector, especially NHS, procurement has been at the centre of the coronavirus crisis, perhaps for the first time bringing the general public an awareness of what procurement itself is all ab...

960x0
3 reasons why recruiters were ready for remote working

Covid-19 has been the catalyst for unprecedented global measures and changes to keep the world safe and healthy during very turbulent times. As part of this, the vast majority of the UK workforce w...